Scrum for the Rest of Us (Non-Software)

I had the pleasure to work with The Braintrust Group and review their book to provide feedback and editorial comments. It has now been published up on Amazon. I defiantly would recommend this book for anyone new or experienced with Scrum. It has a lot of interesting tips and real world problems/solutions as well as pitfalls to look out for. I have to promote it since my names in the book :) The great thing about the book is that the word "software" isn't used once. Now that it's been shown that Scrum can be used outside of software projects.

Product Description

Are you... Trying to implement Scrum outside of software development? Looking for specific answers to your deepest Scrum questions? Wanting modern advice that will benefit your organization?

Scrum For The Rest Of US offers practical advice, questions and answers, and tips that will help you avoid costly mistakes with Scrum. Don't waste hours searching the web, reading references that are outdated, when you can have everything that you need in a single guide.

It's THE first book written specifically for anyone interested in Scrum outside of the software development industry. Regardless of what field you are in, this book specifically points out areas that may challenge you and your organization with adopting Scrum.

Perhaps you are new to Agile/Scrum, have heard a few buzzwords, but the core concepts are not familiar yet. Perhaps you are an Agile/Scrum veteran who wants to avoid roadblocks or improve implementation. Regardless of where you are on your path to mastery, this book is intended to help you maximize the benefits of Scrum.

> What you'll find in this book:

  • When and why to use Scrum

  • In-depth coverage of the roles, meetings, and artifacts in Scrum

  • Clear answers to frequently asked questions

  • Common pitfalls and how to avoid them

  • Practical case studies and examples

  • Tips and tricks for maximizing success

  • Full glossary of terms and definitions

> What you won't find in this book:

  • Technobabble and industry jargon

  • Software references

  • Boring charts and meaningless statistics